Tai Otoshi Judo Throw in BJJ Competition (2013 Pans)

To me one the main benefits of judo for a jiu jitsu competitor is as simple as providing confidence in basic movement on the feet, basic gripping, basic posture, etc. That’s how it helped me, but it’s especially cool to see the occasional judoka pull off a textbook throw at the higher level of competition. I’ve seen a few drop morote seoi nage’s and a lot of excellent foot sweeps, but I haven’t yet seen a tai otoshi pulled off quite as nice as it was done in the following clip of a brown belt match from the 2013 Pans:

Here’s Jimmy Pedro breaking down this exact technique. He describes a useful grip variation for a BJJ competitor, but the guy in the above clip didn’t need the variation. He did it the old school judo way.

0 thoughts on “Tai Otoshi Judo Throw in BJJ Competition (2013 Pans)

  1. Link

    The typical bend-over posture makes the opponent vulnerable to throws like tai-otoshi. It’s not actually that hard to do when the opponent gives you the chance.

    Reply
    1. Lex Post author

      Jiu jitsu players usually do not follow/push forward when they’re bent over, so you have to threaten a backward attack like kouchi first to set up the forward throw. I think judo, wrestling, jiu jitsu, mma are all easy when the “opponent gives you the chance” and you’ve put in the tens of thousands of reps in drilling and randori on the technique that capitalizes on that chance.

      Reply
      1. Link

        It’s enough that their posture is bend-over, you have to make the opponent take a step forward and enter for the throw on that timing. I have done it many times to people in such position.

        Reply
  2. Arseny

    I did the same throw in Finland BJJ Open. I guess I did it twice and haven’t received any points, because referee said I had to throw the opponent and control him on the ground for at least 3 seconds…

    Reply
    1. Lex Post author

      Yeah, that’s a recent change in BJJ rules that is a big negative for judoka. You don’t just have to throw them but you have to throw and control a dominant top position for 3 seconds. Sorry you had to experience, but hopefully you got some highlight video material from it 😉

      Reply
  3. JudokaRob

    Tai O Toshi has become one of my go to throws for Jiu-Jitsu. As a five year Judo veteran I’ve recently decided to quit competition Judo and start using my Judo for Jiu-Jitsu.

    So far the most successful combination I’ve found against all ranks of Jiujitsuka is O Soto Gari to Ko Soto Gari to Tai O Toshi or various other forward throws with a high collar or around the back grip.

    It’s few and far between I hit my standing Sode, but I learned the hard way that Seoi-Nage and Uchi-Mata are a surefire way to end up in a bad position.

    Reply
    1. Lex Post author

      I’m right with you on the seoi and uchimata. I think it all depends on what kind of grips you like to do those throws with, but for me the seoi (my favorite throw) became out of the question as well. The ken ken uchimata can still work but that’s not the “real” uchimata 😉 Kataguruma (in many variations) is great, but now is completely illegal in judo unfortunately.

      Reply
      1. JudokaRob

        Everything is illegal in Judo! 😛 I started emulating the left handed grip ala koga and travis Stevens just so I can effectively break grips on my lapel.

        Either way, after my third shoulder separation and various other injuries relating to competition I’m done!

        Reply

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